A Simple Explanation!

All of us have an immune system. When we have a cut, cold virus or other damage to our body then our immune system responds and fights the problem. It is normal for our cells to divide and multiply. However, if one our cells divides abnormally then cancer cells can develop. Because these cancer cells are part of our body, our immune system does not recognize them.

Immunology covers a range of possible cancer treatments (also known as biological therapy or biotherapy). These treatments target the cancer cells. Special drugs are being created that stimulate the T-cells (the good cells in our bodies) to find and attack tumors (cancerous cells). Vaccines are also being developed that have a similar effect.

Immunology drugs are reported by the medical profession as generally very effective and well tolerated by our bodies. Existing immunology drugs address relatively few types of cancer today. However, new drugs, approved by the FDA; in clinical trials; or available in other countries are in development.

At ImmunoDigest.com, we will provide information on successful patient case histories in the hope that the success of others will provide a path to a cure for our readers.
Understanding Immunology and Cancer

Melanoma
kidneys, Liver, Stomach

Tom had terrible stomach pains. It was only with great difficulty that he could swim or climb a set of stairs. “Tests revealed a tumor the size of a quarter on his small intestine. He underwent surgery and chemotherapy. The cancer spread to this liver and kidneys. His diagnosis: Stage 4 melanoma which was typically fatal within a year. Then he was introduced to Yervoy and his tumors began to melt away. Nine years later Tom is still alive.

David Lane
Scientific Director
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York
James Allison
Head of Immunology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX
Bert Vogelstein
Director
Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins Cancer Center, Baltimore MD
  • Yervoy
USA
Melanoma
Spine

Richard was diagnosed in 2008 at the age of 43. He underwent two surgeries, radiation and chemotherapy. But tumors spread to his lung and spine. In 2011, he enrolled in a study of Yorvay. “After his fourth treatment at Dana Farber, scans showed his tumor had shrunk. But is “wasn’t working” and he was taken off the study. Dr. Hodi put Richard in a study of Keytruda in March 2012. By August 2012, there wasn’t any evidence of disease on his scans…” “I was on the two clinical trials and I was kicked off two clinical trials…you wouldn’t expect that I would be the pot of gold.”

Dr. F. Stephen Hodi
Director of the Melanoma Center
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston MA
  • Yervoy
  • Keytruda
USA
Melanoma
Back, Liver, Lung

Richard, a veterinarian in Ozark, Alabama discovered a mole on his back that had begun bleeding. It was melanoma and soon progressed to his lung and liver. His father had died of melanoma and he knew his future was bleak. Richard enrolled in a trial that lead to a drug called Yervoy. Within two months, the tumors were shrinking. Years later, “his cancer has stabilized.”

F. Stephen Hodi
Director of the Melanoma Center
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston MA
Walter J. Urba
Director of Cancer Research
Providence Cancer Center, Portland OR
USA
Lung cancer
Lung

In February 2015, Peter was told his suspected laryngitis was cancer. Rounds of chemotherapy and one dose of radiation couldn’t halt its spread. “After one course of Keytruda, his tumors had disappeared. He said his oncologist couldn’t believe his eyes.” “Without his daughter’s research, Peter said he wouldn’t even know about the drug.” “I just got caught up believing everything they said at the hospital.”

Unknown
  • Keytruda
New Zealand
Lung cancer
Lung

At age 58, David was diagnosed with lung cancer. After surgery removed much of his right lung, and he had aggressive chemo – all failed. In 2010, he entered a trial at Johns Hopkins Hospital. In four months “a scan showed his tumor had significantly improved. Remnants of the tumor still showed up on scans when his treatment ended after two years, but it hasn’t grown since.” Twice, David was told he had less than a year to live. “He hasn’t taken the drug for 23 months.”

Dr. Julie Brahmer
Oncologist
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore MD
Roy Herbst
Chief of Medical Oncology
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven CT
USA